Introducing the Polestar 4 SUV, expected to arrive in local showrooms in August 2024. See how much you could save through a novated lease

Introducing the Polestar 4

Introducing the Polestar 4

The Polestar 4 SUV is expected to arrive in local showrooms in August 2024. The range will consist of two variants: the Long Range Single Motor RWD and Long Range Dual Motor AWD.

Introducing the Polestar 4 SUV, expected to arrive in local showrooms in August 2024. See how much you could save through a novated lease.

The Polestar line-up

The Polestar 4 looks very much like a member of the Polestar family, with its ‘Thor’s Hammer’ LED headlights, retractable doorhandles, and chunky Polestar styling, so it will sit comfortably alongside the smaller Polestar 2 crossover hatch and larger Polestar 3 SUV in showrooms.

That naming convention may provoke confusion, however, because the order in price and size is 2, 4 and 3. I don’t think Polestar cares, but some customers won’t understand.

The Polestar 2 is 4.6m long by 1.48m tall and sits on a 2735mm wheelbase.

The Polestar 3 large SUV is 30cm longer and 13cm taller and sits on a 25cm longer wheelbase.

The Polestar 4 mid-size SUV-coupe is 6cm shorter in length and 8cm shorter in height than the 3 but has a 3m wheelbase, the longest of the trio (2999mm to be exact but come on).

All have four doors plus a rear hatch, and all have two rows of seating for five occupants. As standard, the Polestar 4 will be sold with the Pilot Pack in Australia, which adds semi-autonomous driving capabilities via the Pilot Assist system.

They’ll be joined by a Polestar 5 to rival the Porsche Taycan large sedan and a Polestar 6 two-door sports-luxury convertible in 2025 and 2026 respectively.

The Polestar 4 looks very much like a member of the Polestar family, with its 'Thor's Hammer' LED headlights, retractable doorhandles, and chunky Polestar styling, so it will sit comfortably alongside the smaller Polestar 2 crossover hatch and larger Polestar 3 SUV in showrooms. That naming convention may provoke confusion, however, because the order in price and size is 2, 4 and 3. I don't think Polestar cares, but some customers won't understand. The Polestar 2 is 4.6m long by 1.48m tall and sits on a 2735mm wheelbase. The Polestar 3 large SUV is 30cm longer and 13cm taller and sits on a 25cm longer wheelbase. The Polestar 4 mid-size SUV-coupe is 6cm shorter in length and 8cm shorter in height than the 3 but has a 3m wheelbase, the longest of the trio (2999mm to be exact but come on). All have four doors plus a rear hatch, and all have two rows of seating for five occupants. As standard, the Polestar 4 will be sold with the Pilot Pack in Australia, which adds semi-autonomous driving capabilities via the Pilot Assist system. They'll be joined by a Polestar 5 to rival the Porsche Taycan large sedan and a Polestar 6 two-door sports-luxury convertible in 2025 and 2026 respectively.

Design differences

SUV coupes, or coupes of any kind, are distinguished by a sharp falling roof line at the rear that gives a sporty fastback silhouette. But this robs the back seat of valuable head room. Polestar’s solution was to do away with the rear window and move the roof’s rear header rail further back, thus freeing up head room inside, but still allowing for that fastback shape.

From a practical point of view, it works a treat, and has led Polestar to add value in other ways, like the digital rear-view mirror, the electrically reclining back seats, and the ‘business class’ ambient lighting behind the occupants.

It all adds to an air of elegance and class in what has to be the biggest and roomiest back seat in its class. Head room is plentiful, as is leg room.

The back seat of the Polestar 4 RWD we sat in had two air vents and two USB-C charging ports. The higher-grade AWD variant has four air vents (two on the B-pillars and two on the centre console) plus a 5.7-inch touchscreen housing back seat climate controls above the two USB-C ports.

Both variants had an electrically reclining rear seatback for greater comfort at some cost to luggage capacity. That luggage capacity, by the way, is 526 litres if the adjustable floor is at the lower of two settings, and includes a built-in plastic-lined wet box under the floor.

There’s also a massive panoramic sunroof standard on all models. An electrochromatic alternative, which can go from opaque to clear at the touch of a button, will cost $2700 in Australia.

Introducing the Polestar 4 SUV, expected to arrive in local showrooms in August 2024. See how much you could save through a novated lease.

What's under the hood?

The Polestar 4 single-motor RWD is a heavy car by combustion engine standards, and at 2230kg it is some 200kg heavier than the Tesla Model Y RWD. But the 200kW and 343Nm electric motor gives the vehicle quickish acceleration that will be acceptable to buyers.

Polestar claims a 0–100km/h time of 7.1 seconds for the 200kW RWD variant, and a WLTP driving range of 610km. The vehicle comes with 11kW AC charging and 200kW DC charging capabilities for its 100kW electric battery.

The 400kW/686Nm AWD variant packs considerably more performance and is very capable of getting the adrenaline pumping as it fires from 0–100km/h in 3.8 seconds. That’s one-tenth slower than the 350kg lighter Model Y Performance, but that tenth is not worth quibbling over. The 400kW Polestar 4 can also recharge at 22kW via AC.

The Polestar 4 AWD is fast, very fast, and it’s an exciting car to drive, especially if a) it has the Performance Pack fitted and b) you mess with the damper and steering assist settings.

Drivers inside Tech

The Polestar 4’s tablet controller is mounted in landscape mode and runs a highly customised version of Android Automotive that is gorgeous to look at and brilliantly easy to use. It’s through this tablet that the driver (and front seat passenger) interacts with the satellite navigation, vehicle dynamics systems, climate control, media, and smartphone mirroring. Virtual buttons to adjust the climate control are always accessible via the bottom of the screen, along with key submenus like ‘car settings’.

The Polestar 4's tablet controller is mounted in landscape mode and runs a highly customised version of Android Automotive that is gorgeous to look at and brilliantly easy to use

The ride

Polestar offers three modes for the dampers, Standard, Nimble and Firm, the latter two progressively sacrificing ride comfort for dynamic agility. It’s worth pointing out that, even in Standard mode, the Polestar 4 has the dynamism to show you a good time through the twisties.

In Nimble and Firm modes, the ride becomes noticeably busier as the car’s suspension reads the road rather that irons it out. This is a deliberate decision by the engineers to give the driver feedback on the road’s surface.

The 4’s weight disadvantage over the Tesla doesn’t adversely impact dynamics, and nor does it make the Polestar more ponderous on turn-in. In fact, it’s impressive just how sharply the Polestar bites initially, and how confidence-inspiring both the front and the rear feel up near their respective grip limits.

Taken from article written by Glenn Butler. To read full article click here.
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